Just published by the Bucks Archaeological Society

This new book brings together, in an easily accessible form, information from all currently known archaeological and documentary sources about the 700-year history of pottery production sites and potters across Buckinghamshire, gathering excavation reports, field names, parish records and national censuses alike to portray a once-important Buckinghamshire industry.

Pots, Potters and Potteries
of Buckinghamshire 1200-1910.

Published October 2019.

Full details >>>

 

BAS Archaeology, Conference – Autumn 2019

Bucks Archaeological Society’s conference

HS2 ArchaeologyDiscoveries from Year 2

Postponed until after the general election, Sorry

on Saturday 23 November at Winslow Public Hall, Elmsfield Gate, MK18 3JG.   1.30-5pm, £3 on the door.  The county’s biggest archaeological dig, on the route of the high-speed rail line, is turning up various unexpected settlements. From Mesolithic to Medieval plus a complex area under investigation in Warwickshire.

Bucks Local History Network Conference

Buckinghamshire Local History Network 2019

ANNUAL CONFERENCE AND FAIR

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE SOCIAL HOUSING
– FROM ALMSHOUSES TO RIGHT-TO-BUY

A one-day conference on the changing face of housing for the people: cottages on manorial estates, the 18th-century workhouse that provided work, the 19th-century workhouse that enforced it, ‘Homes fit for Heroes’ that launched council-provided housing after the First World War, then the New Towns and Milton Keynes after the Second, and its dismantling through Right-to-Buy.

PLUS displays and bookstalls by the county’s local history and archaeology societies.

Saturday 5 October 2019

at The Oculus, the Aylesbury Vale District Council conference centre in Gatehouse Road, Aylesbury

For full details and tickets in advance by post or on-line >>

RECORDS OF BUCKS 2019 EDITION now available.

Records of Bucks Vol 59

Records of Bucks (volume 59) includes articles on newly-discovered Romanesque wall painting at St Mary’s Church, Old Linslade, the effects of the Wars of the Roses on Chesham, and Marlow’s medieval manor hall.

For full list of contents and ordering.

Price to non-members: £15.00, plus £3.50 for post and packing. Members receive Records volume 59 free – so why not JOIN THE SOCIETY?

Marlow Archaeology re-open Rookery Park excavation (27 & 28 July)

After a successful excavation in 2013, MAS are revisiting the site in Rookery Park, Marlow in an attempt to put a date on the earlier building that was revealed.

Marlow Archaeology will be reopening an excavation in Rookery Park, Marlow on Saturday and Sunday 27 & 28 July, as part of the National Festival of Archaeology.

The excavation will take place between about 10.30am and 3.30pm on each day.

Between 2011 and 2013, Marlow Archaeological Society (MAS) carried out excavations to investigate the remains of The Rookery, a Victorian villa in what is now the park. It was the location of a 18th Century farmhouse, which was replaced by the villa in about 1850. This was subsequently altered and extended, being demolished in the 1960’s and the area turned into a park. There was also a suspicion that there were also much earlier buildings, possibly a Chapel associated with the Knights Templar of the 13thC. Excavation revealed parts of the 1775 farmhouse and a cellar with chalk block walls. Evidence associated with the cellar walls indicated a construction date around 1670, but no records have been found of an earlier building on the site.

It seems unlikely that this was the site of a chapel, but the nature of the earlier building remains a mystery. Our excavation may shed light on the entrance to the cellar and provide further evidence of its origin.

It is important to investigate and record our historic heritage assets in order better to inform planning decisions and maintain the distinctive character of Marlow.

Everyone is very welcome to come and see what is revealed.

University of Cambridge reveals ‘changing face of UK’ in aerial photos

A news item from the BBC:

A collection of aerial photographs described as the “historical Google Earth” has been made available online by the University of Cambridge. RAF pilots were asked to capture the bomb-scarred post-war period to the emergence of motorways and new cities. The collection dates back to 1945, with more recent images captured in 2009 for a university project. The first 1500 images of 0.5million are now available on the Cambridge Digital Library http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/   including this one of Dorchester on Thames in 1948.

How Woughton kept its Green – Talk 9th Febuary

The next BAS lecture – open to all and at no charge – will be on Saturday 9th at 2.30pm in the Bucks County Museum HP20 2QP. Julian Hunt will now talk on How Woughton kept its Green:  the story of the ancient village green at Woughton on the Green which survived Parliamentary enclosure, the construction of the Grand Junction Canal and the creation of the New City of Milton Keynes. This talk is a prelude to a proposed BAS summer visit to Woughton when we will inspect the house platforms, sunken lanes and ridge and furrow in and around the Green as well as visiting the church and the remaining timber-framed farmhouses.

Bucks Archaeological Society Library team, County Museum, Church Street Aylesbury HP20 2QP, Tel. 01296 397200

Email: bucksas@buckscountymuseum.org Website: www.bucksas.org.uk

The Library is open to researchers each Wednesday 10am – 4pm. Do drop in but it would be helpful if you could make an appointment so that we can prepare for your visit. Please ring (Wednesdays or voicemail other days) or email to make an appointment.