CBA South Midlands: conference news

On Saturday 5th October, CBA South Midlands will be jointly hosting a conference to consider how recent work has advanced our understanding of the research questions that have been highlighted in the East Midlands Historic Environment Research Framework (EMHERF) – which, unlike the CBA, includes Northants! It will include demonstrations of the online Research Framework and displays of recent  projects, with presentations focusing on the post-glacial period (a CBA East Midlands conference in Newark in November will look at the Ice Age landscape).

The conference will be held at the University of Nottingham; the final programme, booking form and map of the university campus (showing the location of the conference venue and free parking areas) are attached.

Booking is now open: you can either complete the attached form and send it to me along with your cheque (payable to CBA East Midlands), or book through Eventbrite at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/east-midlands-research-framework-new-frameworks-for-our-past-tickets-61689298352

Tables and poster boards will be available  to display the results of recent research across the region. Please contact the EMHERF conference team at emherf@yorkat.co.uk if you would like to reserve a table or poster board to disseminate the results of your own work within the East Midlands.

Best wishes,

David

____________________________
David Ingham FSA MCIfA
Project Manager
ALBION ARCHAEOLOGY
St Mary’s Church
St Mary’s Street
Bedford
MK42 0AS

Tel: 0300 300 6874
Mobile: 07717 866767
e-mail:  dp.ingham@albion-arch.com

Bucks Gardens Trust Talk – Saturday 27 April – Kate Harwood on Geoffrey Jellicoe

Just a quick reminder of the Bucks Gardens Trust’s final Spring talk for 2019 on Saturday 27th (April) – Kate Harwood on Geoffrey Jellicoe, 1900-1996, English architect, town planner, landscape architect, garden designer and author, his greatest interest being landscape and garden design;  undoubtedly one of the 20th century’s leading landscape architects with a career spanning almost seventy years.

Kate will take us on a journey through some of his most significant works – a number being within striking distance of Buckinghamshire.

The talk will take place at the Bucks County Museum, starting at 2.30pm with tea to follow.   The cost to members is £12 and for guests, £14.

If you have not already booked for Kate’s talk and wish to come, please could you be kind enough to contact Rosemary Jury at: rosemaryjury@wendoveremail.co.uk or 01296 715491.   Thank  you.

The Lawrence Brothers and the Indian Mutiny. Weds. 20 March, at 8pm

The Buckinghamshire Branch of the Historical Association meets again next Wednesday, 20 March, at 8pm, when Tom Shannon of Oxford Metrics plc and Soldiers of Oxfordshire Museum will be speaking on The Lawrence Brothers and the Indian Mutiny.

 

Venue: Friends’ Meeting House, Rickfords Hill, Aylesbury HP20 2RT.

 

Everyone welcome: admission charge of £3 to non-members of the Historical Association.

 

More information on the Branch may be found at their website: http://www.buckshistoricalassociation.org.uk/

University of Cambridge reveals ‘changing face of UK’ in aerial photos

A news item from the BBC:

A collection of aerial photographs described as the “historical Google Earth” has been made available online by the University of Cambridge. RAF pilots were asked to capture the bomb-scarred post-war period to the emergence of motorways and new cities. The collection dates back to 1945, with more recent images captured in 2009 for a university project. The first 1500 images of 0.5million are now available on the Cambridge Digital Library http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/   including this one of Dorchester on Thames in 1948.

Thurs. 14 March – THE ANGLO-SAXONS OF THE UPPER THAMES: dress and identity

Dr Toby Martin

Lecturer in Early Medieval Archaeology, IoA, University of Oxford

 

Thursday 14 March 2019 at 8pm

Main Hall, LISTON HALL

Liston Road, Marlow  SL7 1DD

 

During the 5th and 6th centuries, the Upper Thames went from being a late Roman complex of villages, villas and towns, becoming a simpler agricultural landscape dotted with small rural hamlets. In economic terms, therefore, the situation became greatly simplified.  In terms of politics and identity, however, the situation became highly complex, with later historical sources recording the violent progress of West Saxons through native Romano-British communities.

Poster at this link: MAS poster A-S of Upper Thames March 14 2019

This talk will attempt to separate fact from fiction by looking at how the people we call Anglo-Saxons living this in region dressed, focusing primarily on the jewellery worn by women,  and what this might tell us about how they thought about themselves and their relationships with far-flung and local communities.

 

PLEASE PAY AT THE DOOR:  Visitors: £4.50    Members MAS/AiM £3     Students £1.50
Free refreshments    Disabled access    ALL ENQUIRIES: 01628 523896

 

Bucks Gardens Trust talk – Dr Gill Clarke on Stanley Spencer – Saturday 30 March

Just a reminder of Dr Gill Clarke’s talk on Stanley Spencer, to be given to the Bucks Gardens Trust on Saturday 30 March at the Bucks County Museum in Aylesbury, starting at 2.30pm with tea to follow.

 

If you have not already booked, but would like to come, please could you be kind enough to let me know:  rosemaryjury@wendoveremail.co.uk

 

The cost of the talk is £12 for Bucks Gardens Trust members with £14 for guests, to include tea.

Bucks Gardens Trust talk – Saturday 23 February

A reminder of our Bucks Gardens Trust talk on Saturday 23 February to be given by Richard Mawrey QC on, ‘The Phantom of the Trianon’.

The talk will be held at the Bucks County Museum starting at 2.30pm with tea to follow at a cost of: £12 for members and £14 for guests.

Regarding Richard Mawrey’s talk: in 1911, Charlotte Anne Moberly and Eleanor Jourdain published a book entitled An Adventure under the names of Elizabeth Morison and Frances Lamont. Their book describes a visit they made to the Petit Trianon, a small château in the grounds of the Palace of Versailles where they claimed to have seen the gardens as they had been in the late eighteenth century as well as ghosts, including Marie Antoinette and others. Their story caused a sensation and was subject to much ridicule.

A garden that is haunted, not only by the ghosts of its inhabitants but also by the spectre of its former landscape, must be unique. How fitting that this garden should be the most famous in Europe – Versailles.

If you would like to attend, please could you be kind enough to contact Rosemary Jury at : rosemaryjury@wendoveremail.co.uk or 01296 715491.